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The Melted Coins - new EP!

 Like a lot of folks locked-down during the pandemic, I found myself with a desire to do something positive with the stressful energy building up inside me.

That led me back to the creative comfort food of songwriting, which has always been a way for me to get lost in the moment in a different way than other forms of writing.

I also had a tremendous amount of fun messing around in GarageBand, recording new instruments and playing with the tools in the program. It was a lovely distraction from everything happening this year.

The five songs on this EP are part of a larger batch I wrote and that may find themselves on other projects, but they felt of a piece and of a time - written and recorded in my home office/guestroom (dubbed the Nana and Papa suite). It's been a refuge for me, and I hope you enjoy what came out of it.

Check out Home Office Suite on Bandcamp here: https://themeltedcoins.bandcamp.com/
And the Melted Coins website here: https://www.themeltedcoins.com/



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